Wednesday’s Parent: 7 great ways to use college ranking lists

Rank college ranking lists. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Rank college ranking lists. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

“Ranking colleges has become a cottage industry with a proliferation of different criteria yielding different college ranking lists. There are plenty of proponents and critics but ultimately the college-bound, stranded in a sea of mixed reviews, must fend for themselves.”

I wrote this back in January of 2012. The controversy over the use and reliability of college ranking lists continues because of the varying criteria the makers use and the mix of fact and opinion. The fact that there are college ranking lists based on the academic to the absurd, from the best in the world universities to the most clean-shaven campuses, adds to the confusion. But there are ways to salvage some useful info to help the college-bound.

I still believe the best list is the one students and parents create but sometimes I catch myself rubbernecking like a driver on a highway. Curiosity takes over and I take a peek. Since many parents and students will, like me, be looking anyway, I’m listing these seven pros for using college ranking lists.

  1. College ranking lists are fun to read and interesting conversation starters between parents and students.
  2. College ranking lists may include important statistics like graduation rate, freshman retention rate, and alumni donations. They may also include important facts about the college selectivity level via current student prior test scores and class standing.
  3. College ranking lists may include schools families have not yet thought about but are worth considering.
  4. College ranking lists show how schools are portrayed and measured up by the list sponsor according to their criteria. If they give great weight to a factor students care about, the school may be worth looking into.
  5. College ranking lists often emphasize brand names and popular colleges which can inspire a search for lesser known or lower rated but better fit schools. These may offer greater chances for admission and more financial aid because they receive much fewer applications.
  6. College ranking lists can serve as tools to hone student critical thinking skills to separate perception from reality.
  7. College ranking lists can be a blueprint for students to create their own personal college ranking list.

Read Suzanne’s post5 Reasons You Should Not Rely on College Ranking Lists

READ MORE: 

4 steps to create a personal college ranking list

The right college fit test

Wednesday’s Parent: The prime relationship between college list and college fit

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Wednesday’s child may be full of woe but Wednesday’s Parent can substitute action for anxiety. Each Wednesday Suzanne Shaffer and I will provide parent tips to get and keep your student on the college track. It’s never too late or too early to start!

The bonus is on the fourth Wednesday of each month when Suzanne and I will host Twitter chat #CampusChat at 9pm ET/6pm PT. We will feature an expert on a topic of interest for parents of the college-bound.

Wednesday’s Parent will give twice the info and double the blog posts on critical parenting issues by clicking on the link at the end of the article from www.pocsmom.com to http://www.parentscountdowntocollegecoach.com/ and vice versa.

Wednesday’s Parent: The prime relationship between college list and college fit

Hand holding the college list is washed by the one measuring college fit. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Hand holding the college list is washed by the one measuring college fit. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

The hand holding the college list is washed by the one measuring college fit. That’s because the list reflects those schools offering students their best chance for success. They match student interests, talents and goals. The current excessively low graduation rate and high student debt show how many parents and students suffer from a disconnect between the two concepts. The bottom line is students will most likely attend one of the schools on their college list, so it better be a good one.

This is how I described it in my blog back in 2011:

Is the foundation to your home crumbling? If it is, you better fix it or move on. The same is true for a college list.

A college list is the foundation of the entire college process because the student will likely attend one of the schools on his list. If the schools listed are not the best ones for student success, your college process is on shaky footings, and you’re in danger of academic and financial failure.

So in the changing framework of college admissions, the prime relationship between college list and college fit remains constant. There are new tools to help families gather information but it is the analysis that counts the most. And the realization that students control most of the college process even though it seems colleges hold all the power.

Students decide how much effort they put into school and extracurricular activities that determine their qualifications. Students determine which schools to consider, visit and apply. Students decide which offer of acceptance to accept.

Students can maximize their power of choice by using my right college fit test to see which colleges measure up to student standards. Concentrate on the areas within students’ sphere of influence. Life is full of choices and college is one of the most influential adult decisions a teen can make. Make it a thoughtful one.

Read Suzanne’s post: What is a Perfect Fit College?

READ more: 

2 opposite ways of nailing the college search

Wednesday’s Parent: 2 phases, 3 points of the forming a college list Part 1

Money influences college choices from the start

Wednesday’s Parent: 7 Shakespearean steps to good decision-making

Wednesday’s Parent: Student-College power shift

RECAP: #CampusChat 5/27 with Jessica Velasco: College Fit

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Wednesday’s child may be full of woe but Wednesday’s Parent can substitute action for anxiety. Each Wednesday Suzanne Shaffer and I will provide parent tips to get and keep your student on the college track. It’s never too late or too early to start!

Suzanne @SuzanneShaffer and I @pocsmom will host Twitter chat #CampusChat at 9pm ET/6pm PT. Our guest this week will be Jessica Velasco @Admissions411 of JLV College Counseling discussing the college fit.

Wednesday’s Parent will give twice the info and double the blog posts on critical parenting issues by clicking on the link at the end of the article from www.pocsmom.com to http://www.parentscountdowntocollegecoach.com/ and vice versa.

Wednesday’s Parent: 6 key online learning questions

Online learning. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Online learning. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

I don’t have a crystal ball to foresee the future shape of education, but if I did, it would probably be a virtual one. That’s because online learning is increasingly permeating daily life from the home to the office to the classroom. It doesn’t take a seer to know families need to get comfortable with their choices to help in both college prep and choosing a college. Here are six questions about online learning answered:

What is a basic integration of online learning? Students may go to a specific online site to read or watch supplemental materials to a traditional classroom or tutoring experience. Access may be free, require signing up, or paying a fee. There is little or no personal interaction during the time online.

Can online learning provide personal interaction? Chat rooms, discussion forums and social media can provide correspondence in real time. Video presentations can add that live lecture vibe especially if the instruction is done via a live online session. However, unlike in a traditional classroom, each individual learner may be independent and out of sight.

What are MOOCs? The term MOOCs is an acronym for Massive Open Online Courses where thousands of students can attend “class” via their access to a computer. Students set and achieve their own learning goals. There may or may not be assignments and tests. They may be free or for a fee if taken for college credit. The degree of technical support may vary along with privacy and confidentiality.

What’s next in online learning? The college-bound can expect to have more online learning experiences in brick and mortar colleges as schools integrate this cheaper educational model to hold down costs. Many online for profit and non-profit schools exist already but the University of the People is “the world’s first non-profit, tuition-free, accredited, online university,” according to Forbes. Since there is no such thing as a free lunch, students pay for their exams, so a degree would cost a more affordable $4000, the article explains. Compare that to the highest higher education total cost of attendance for the single 2015-2016 school year which is on it’s way to exceed $70,000.

What are the major online learning pitfalls? Because of less or no face-to-face in-person interactions, students have to be more independent and self-motivated learners or they may drop out. They must find other ways to hone their social and soft skills colleges and employers crave. Participating in extracurricular activities, joining professional groups and working in internships can help fill the social gap to develop communication, leadership and teamwork abilities. The pressure is on to keep social media and other online interaction noses clean. The commercial value to students and their completion rate of online learning courses and degrees are unproven compared to traditionally earned diplomas in the business and education marketplace.

What are the major online learning advantages? Students who take MOOCs in high school and do well may stand out as proving they are college ready. They also have the opportunity of learning from a wide selection of interests with an instructor that may otherwise be prohibitive based on cost and location. Students will likely see more businesses like Starbucks and Walmart that will pay all or part of the costs for their employees to take courses toward a certain degree online only from a particular college.

Read Suzanne’s post: Should Your Student Consider Online Learning?

READ more: Parents may help their college-bound kids hone the top soft skills 

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Wednesday’s child may be full of woe but Wednesday’s Parent can substitute action for anxiety. Each Wednesday Suzanne Shaffer and I will provide parent tips to get and keep your student on the college track. It’s never too late or too early to start!

The bonus is on the fourth Wednesday of each month when Suzanne and I will host Twitter chat #CampusChat at 9pm ET/6pm PT. We will feature an expert on a topic of interest for parents of the college-bound.

Wednesday’s Parent will give twice the info and double the blog posts on critical parenting issues by clicking on the link at the end of the article from www.pocsmom.com to http://www.parentscountdowntocollegecoach.com/ and vice versa.

Wednesday’s Parent: 5 surprising uses of a college prep resume

Resume for college prep. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Resume for college prep. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Many parents and students understand the importance of a resume for job applications but few use it as a major college prep tool. If your college-bound child hasn’t composed one yet, suggest he do it now. Then read the following five tips to use a resume for college preparation. Go back and reread the curriculum vitae. You will never look at a resume in the same way again.

Use a resume for planning. It is a great grounding tool for assessing where you are and where you want to be. Find the gaps on your resume that need to be filled. Think about what academic and extracurricular experiences when added would make a reader take positive notice. Check the school, college and local newspaper for community service, club, and activity ideas. Bring the resume to consult with your school counselor, teachers and mentors for course selection, test preparation, college and scholarship searches. Match your future goals and current interests when choosing.

Use a resume as a quick college sorting tool. A resume has a factual record of qualifications via accomplishments. Measure them objectively against college requirements. Do you meet, exceed or fall short as compared to the average admitted student? The answer becomes a list of target/match, safety and reach schools (see 4 steps to create a personal college ranking list and Wednesday’s Parent: 2 phases, 3 points of the forming a college list Part 1).

Use a resume to be objective. Be honest, would you pick you? Does the resume convince you that you are an overall great match for what you are seeking (see above: planning)? If not, it may not be the substance that is lacking but the form in which it is presented. Are there too many bullet points, too few action or descriptive words, missing hyperlinks, or grammar/spelling errors? Read it out loud to ensure the font is easily read and it captures the spirit of your achievements. Then check your attitude, social media and appearance. All of these and your resume should be on the same page.

Use a resume for college and scholarship applications. In addition to academic records and essays, college applications and many private outside scholarship sponsors want to know about work experience, clubs, activities, honors, memberships and offices held. It will be easier to complete your applications because all of this info is contained in a resume.

Use a resume to network. Ask a teacher, potential employer, local community leader, professional association president and government representative for feedback on your resume. Write a thank you note for his time and suggestions. Well done, you have an important contact, helpful info, and added to your own network!

If your student hasn’t started a resume, recommend she whip one up ASAP and continue to update it. You don’t want to forget to include something meaningful and you want to continue to maintain perspective.

Read Suzanne’s post: The High School Resume-Getting to the Point 

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Wednesday’s child may be full of woe but Wednesday’s Parent can substitute action for anxiety. Each Wednesday Suzanne Shaffer and I will provide parent tips to get and keep your student on the college track. It’s never too late or too early to start!

The bonus is on the fourth Wednesday of each month when Suzanne and I will host Twitter chat #CampusChat at 9pm ET/6pm PT. We will feature an expert on a topic of interest for parents of the college-bound.

Wednesday’s Parent will give twice the info and double the blog posts on critical parenting issues by clicking on the link at the end of the article from www.pocsmom.com to http://www.parentscountdowntocollegecoach.com/ and vice versa.

Wednesday’s Parent: Savvy shoppers have an advantage in the college process

Savvy shoppers have an advantage but no guarantees in the college process. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Savvy shoppers have an advantage but no guarantees in the college process. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

From shopping for food staples to procuring college diplomas, parents and students do better when they are conscientious consumers. It’s about understanding needs, assessing quality and matching budget. For big or little ticket purchases, savvy shoppers know to look beyond the marketing and research the product. As for the higher education choice, buyer beware because there are no warranties or guarantees.

I asked this classic question in a former article:

Is college a love match or a consumer purchase?

meaning If the goal is to find the best pick out of several thousand possibilities, should students look for student-college chemistry or search for a smart consumer purchase? The problem is the brain’s logic may not be in balance with the heart’s choice, especially when brand names are involved. And brand names usually come with a premium price.

A fascinating lesson in brand name economics from the Library of Economics and Liberty phrased this question:

(T)he question is not whether consumers are ignorant or irrational when they pay a higher price for a brand-name product, but whether they are paying too much for the additional quality assurance brand names necessarily provide.

Students or parents may want a brand name school. Name recognition in the market place, association with quality, and bragging rights are powerful lures. But “generic” brands offer something special, too. Students may receive an equally great education at a better price. Also, just because families are not familiar with a particular college, doesn’t mean it lacks a good reputation among its peers, graduates, employers, local area, region and those in the know.

It takes a lot more effort to dig deeper and learn about a school’s uniqueness, programs and opportunities. Knowing that successful graduates come from a wide variety of colleges can motivate the process to look beyond the amenities of luxury dorm rooms, brand names and fancy stadiums to find the place that will lead to best chance for student success during and after college. Maybe that’s a brand name or maybe it isn’t. Savvy consumers will take the time to find out.

Take a moment to reread the “Get selfish” part of Wednesday’s Parent: 5 fantastic tips to refine a college list. Connect with your inner consumer to find your college deal and read how value is based on what the student has done to maximize his higher education opportunities and make every college dollar count wherever he attends in Discover your college warranty

Read Suzanne’s post: A Rose by Any Other Name Would Smell as Sweet

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Wednesday’s child may be full of woe but Wednesday’s Parent can substitute action for anxiety. Each Wednesday Suzanne Shaffer and I will provide parent tips to get and keep your student on the college track. It’s never too late or too early to start!

Suzanne and I host Twitter chat #CampusChat at 9pm ET/6pm PT on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Except this month, we are hosting an open mic night on Wednesday, December 17. Bring your questions and comments about college prep over the holidays! 

Wednesday’s Parent will give twice the info and double the blog posts on critical parenting issues by clicking on the link at the end of the article from www.pocsmom.com to http://www.parentscountdowntocollegecoach.com/ and vice versa.

Wednesday’s Parent: 3 ways to consider college location

3 ways to consider college location. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

3 ways to consider college location. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Like for real estate buyers, location is a main issue for the college-bound and their parents. Location affects costs and desirability for both house and college hunters. However, for those composing a college list, there are three different ways to consider college location.

1. Consider college location as neighborhood opportunities. Urban, suburban and rural communities offer different chances for internships and employment, depending on local businesses and government offices. Student housing options are affected by on and off-campus residence choices. Cultural opportunities and social events vary with nearby attractions, museums and theaters. Recreational and sporting possibilities depend on terrain including nearby arenas, slopes, parkland, forests and water. Weather may create seasonal activities.

2. Consider college location as ease of visitation. Distance and position between home and campus impacts travel arrangements for students coming home and parents visiting the college. Cost and time for traveling also varies by method used like train, plane or motor vehicle. Then there are the added expenses of meals and lodging. Every location has different options that can accommodate certain numbers of people. Family Days, moving in/out and graduation may limit available resources.

3. Consider college location as relocation. Only 59% who started in a four-year Bachelor’s program in 2006 graduated by 2012, six years later, according to the latest government study. After spending up to half a dozen years learning, socializing and working in one place, many students grow attached to that community. They may also have developed networking relationships with mentors and local businesses. When a job offer is extended, many accept.

College location is important on many different levels. It is one of three main criteria for forming a great college list. Casting a college application vote explains the necessity for the college-bound to find their college PALs. The “L” in college PALs stands for Location.

Read Suzanne’s post: My Daughter Chose a College by Location

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Wednesday’s child may be full of woe but Wednesday’s Parent can substitute action for anxiety. Each Wednesday Suzanne Shaffer and I will provide parent tips to get and keep your student on the college track. It’s never too late or too early to start!

The bonus is on the fourth Wednesday of each month when Suzanne and I will host Twitter chat #CampusChat at 9pm ET/6pm PT. We will feature an expert on a topic of interest for parents of the college-bound.

Wednesday’s Parent will give twice the info and double the blog posts on critical parenting issues by clicking on the link at the end of the article from www.pocsmom.com to http://www.parentscountdowntocollegecoach.com/ and vice versa.

Scholarship Mom Alert: Innovation in Education Scholarship

 

Monthly Innovation in Education Scholarship. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Monthly Innovation in Education Scholarship. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Deadlines are the college-bound’s worst enemy so wouldn’t it be wonderful if a scholarship was available more than once in a calendar year? Even twice would be nice but how about twelve times! Yes, the Innovation in Education Scholarship offers a monthly scholarship contest which translates into a dozen different deadlines!

Leave it to Scholarship Expert Monica L. Matthews to feature this scholarship gem along with her vital winning tips in her must-read

Innovation in Education Scholarship

Missing deadlines can be disastrous. Read Here’s the dish on college deadlines for why. Many deadline choices make it so much easier to fit into a busy college-bound schedule. It also alleviates some of the stress from the pressure of one set deadline especially when something else comes up to rearrange the priority list.

So hurray to Monica for highlighting the monthly Innovation in Education Scholarship!

Good Luck!!!

Why You Need To Diversify Your College List

Steve Palley, co-founder and CEO of ApplyMap

Steve Palley, co-founder and CEO of ApplyMap

If you and your student are having trouble forming a college list, read this guest post! Steve Palley CEO/co-founder of ApplyMap aims to simplify the college search process by employing advanced statistics and social science. He shows us the statistician approach to use math and statistical thinking to find colleges with the best chance of student success. Take it away Steve.

Practically every parent has explained to their child why putting all of one’s eggs in a single basket is a bad idea. Most parents who are active on the stock market know not to put their money into just a few big-name stocks, too. But too many forget the power of diversification when helping their teenaged son or daughter with their college lists — even though it may be the single most important step in the whole college application process.

Now, I know what you’re thinking: sure, the college list is important, but more important than grades, test scores, the essay, and even financial aid?! Absolutely yes. Let me explain.

Picking the right colleges to apply to is the most important step because it’s the first step. Everything else you and your teen will do during the college application process — and beyond — depends on it.

As a statistician who specializes in analyzing college admissions, I think about the problem like this. When all is said and done (and assuming they don’t transfer), your teen will attend exactly one college or university. What’s the absolute best-case scenario? He or she will be:

  1. Graduated in four years or less;

  2. Happy, healthy, and with great job prospects;

  3. Bearing little to no debt.

Those are our goals. Now, working backwards from there, what combination of steps should we take to maximize the likelihood of this outcome? We live in an uncertain world so there are no guarantees, but we can certainly do things to make it more probable given the information we have today.

Well, if you want your teen to get his or her degree on time and debt-free, with a great idea of what they want to do next AND the skills and connections to make it happen, they should go to the school where they’ll do the best. Duh. End of article.

Just kidding. How do we know where your son or daughter will have the best overall college experience (or as many parents and the Obama Administration now think about it, the best college experience given the cost)? Again, we can’t know for sure, because a young person maturing into an adult is a very complex system. Neither they nor we have a clear idea of what is best for them to begin with, and it’s a moving target anyway given how much young people change in college.

So, we need to make some educated guesses based on what little we do know. Graduates from Top 10 schools tend to be very well connected, but it’s hard to gain admission. Flagship public universities can deliver tremendous bang for the buck, but on-time graduation rates are lower. Smaller liberal arts colleges can deliver a totally unique educational experience, but they can also cost a pretty penny.

The bad news is that with all of this in mind, it’s effectively impossible to identify the single best school for your teen to attend. The good news is that trying to do that is a waste of time anyway, because applying to a single school is a very poor strategy. If you apply to a single selective school, you might not get in; if you apply to a single non-selective school, you could almost certainly do better.

Your teen should apply to at least eight schools that make sense both individually (meaning that your teen would do well there) and collectively (meaning that each school fits together into a larger strategy). This, finally, is where college list diversification comes into play. A properly balanced list can virtually guarantee that your teen will have a solid college experience, but building one isn’t easy.

Suppose your teen got sick of all this college talk and simply applied to all eight Ivies, Stanford and MIT. That’s not an optimal strategy for two reasons. First, there’s a real chance they won’t get into any of those schools (about 15% with a 4.0 unweighted GPA and a 2200 on the SATs). Second, those are all fantastic schools, but would one randomly-selected school from that list be better for your teen than every other school outside of it? Probably not.

OK, so why not expand that list of top schools to 20 or even 30? Now you have two more issues. First, the more schools they apply to, the more choices they’ll have, but that’s a problem in itself. In fact, having too many choices is often more stressful than having too few, and you’ll still be flying blind as far as college fit goes. Second, nobody wants to apply to that many schools. There’s no better way to make your teen hate your guts.

Mathematically, the perfect college list looks something like this: two dream schools, four reach schools, four match schools, and two safety schools (the classic bell curve shape) — and every school on the list, regardless of selectivity, is a good fit for your teen. If you’ve done it right, your son or daughter will have three to five great options to choose from, and they will fall in love with one of them after visiting.

Now you see how a little statistical thinking can go a long way in the college applications game!

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Steve Palley is an entrepreneur, academic, and educator. He is the co-founder and CEO of ApplyMap, a new website that builds statistically balanced college lists, as well as a graduate student at UCLA.

Wednesday’s Parent: 5 fantastic tips to refine a college list Part 2

Finalizing a college list. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Finalizing a college list. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

The hard part of forming a college list is whittling it down to those schools that offer a student the best chance for success. Last week had tips about information gathering to jump start the process in 2 phases, 3 points for forming a college list.

Here is Part 2 with five tips for analyzing and refining the choices.

!. Define the student’s definition of success The definition of student success varies with each student. Wednesday’s Parent: Hunting and gathering a college list Part 2 explained this and gave five ways parents may help their child find their college matches.

2. Judge the college. How good a job a will the school do to help a student achieve his vision? Use the parent-student team approach to have frank discussions about college, career and future lifestyle goals. Write them down. Go back to the college list and eliminate those that are least likely to help the student attain her dreams.

3. Take a closer look. Go over the list again twice. The first time think emotionally. How did the campus make the student feel from the college visit? Sometimes it’s an unexplainable positive or negative gut reaction. The second time think logically about the school’s academic and extracurricular offerings. If there is a wide divide between the two impressions, it’s probably not a good choice. Students have to be vested in their college attendance for best chance of thriving.

4. Get selfish. Though they may be considered part of fact gathering, brand names, recommendations and what others are doing do not determine the final college list. The focus is on what will work best for a particular student based on his talents, skills, goals and qualifications. Colleges use the admission process to find students they want. Students should use the process to find schools that will help the student get what he wants.

5. Put in the time. The more time spent on making a good college list, the better the chance for student success. Find the places where the student is most likely to get a great education that:

  • Fits her abilities and stretches her opportunities
  • Provides the tools to graduate (or go on to grad school) on time
  • Prepares him for a future with manageable debt and the ability to be self-supporting at the life-style desired

Read Suzanne’s post: Making the Illogical Logical-The Final College List

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Suzanne and I will share more insights into making a great college list on Wednesday’s Parent night (the fourth Wednesday of each month) on #CampusChat, Wednesday, July 23, 9pm ET/6pm PT. We will talk about the many factors to consider, how to finalize the list and the parent role in the process. Join us and bring your questions and comments.

UPDATE: If you missed the chat or participated and want to review the great information and links shared, check out the recap.

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Wednesday’s child may be full of woe but Wednesday’s Parent can substitute action for anxiety. Each Wednesday Suzanne Shaffer and I will provide parent tips to get and keep your student on the college track. It’s never too late or too early to start!

Wednesday’s Parent will give twice the info and double the blog posts on critical parenting issues by clicking on the link at the end of the article from www.pocsmom.com to http://www.parentscountdowntocollegecoach.com/ and vice versa.

Wednesday’s Parent: 2 phases, 3 points of the forming a college list Part 1

Creating a college list. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

Creating a college list. Photo by Wendy David-Gaines

College lists hold the key to college success. Your student will be applying to schools off the final list and attending one accepting him or her.

There are two parts to completing the task of creating a great college list. The first is about information gathering (here in Part 1) and the second has to do with refining and analyzing the choices (Part 2 will follow next week).

To underscore the importance of a good college list, here is a review of three important points contained in former posts to help you help your student complete phase one of the college list formation process:

!. Hunting and gathering a college list Part 1 Form a parent-student team that is all about helping the student find and realize his goals, his options, his interests.

2. Pose this question: Is college a love match or a consumer purchase? Get organized by knowing what to look for. Check out the college consumer variables, campus personality and school quirks to answer this question.

3.  Picking a college by its flavor It takes strategy to form a good college list of well-suited schools that will help students stay on track and graduate. Start classifying schools that meet similar student needs.

 Read Suzanne’s post: Illogical College Choices—Part 1

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Wednesday’s child may be full of woe but Wednesday’s Parent can substitute action for anxiety. Each Wednesday Suzanne Shaffer and I will provide parent tips to get and keep your student on the college track. It’s never too late or too early to start!

The bonus is on the fourth Wednesday of each month when Suzanne and I will host Twitter chat #CampusChat at 9pm ET/6pm PT. We will feature an expert on a topic of interest for parents of the college-bound.

Wednesday’s Parent will give twice the info and double the blog posts on critical parenting issues by clicking on the link at the end of the article from www.pocsmom.com to http://www.parentscountdowntocollegecoach.com/ and vice versa.